2022 Careers Annual Report

2022

“I came in knowing nothing, but my mentors have shown me how to do so many different things. This internship has helped me explore and get some experience instead of just going in blind. I got a feel for plumbing and HVAC and now I’m thinking of pursuing it. My experience here has really helped me learn and I hope to get enough knowledge under my belt to bring it back to my community and hopefully start my own business.”

Jake Day Chief
Plumbing Intern

“Working with Blood Tribe Employment and Skills Training and CAREERS for an internship gave me more of a shot to get out there, be noticed, and to get some experience under my belt. Sometimes kids don’t have a way to get started and this really sets them up with everything they need. It’s such a great program and I want more kids to get into it.”

Jayton Day Chief
Sheet Metal Intern

OUR MISSION

Enable youth on their path to rewarding careers.

Strategic Priorities

Employer
Engagement

More employers providing career opportunities for youth.

Youth
Participation

More youth participating in
work integrated learning.

Community
Reach

Key partners are
increasingly leveraged.

Fiscal & Organizational Sustainability

Good governance and effective resources are in place to deliver on the strategic plan.
CELEBRATING A RECORD YEAR

2022 in Review and the New Year Ahead

A message from the Chair and President & CEO

What a tremendous year it has been for CAREERS and our stakeholders. When the foundation was established 25 years ago, it was hard to imagine the motivating force it would become today. Over the past quarter century, we have weathered tough economic times, changing skilled workforce needs, and more recently, a global pandemic. Not only has CAREERS survived these challenges, but we have also thrived, becoming more adaptable and stronger as a result.

CAREERS, with our school and employer partners, set a milestone this year connecting an all-time high number of Alberta youth interns with employers for work integrated learning opportunities. 

With 2,470 internships, we have confidently met aggressive targets, surpassing the previous record in 2014 when the economy was booming.

The Youth Internship Incentive Program (YiiP), in partnership with the Alberta Government, continued to provide financial support for 358 employers to create more opportunities. We are also very proud that these internships included a growing and significant number of young women (537) and Indigenous youth (383).
JIM CARTER
Board Chair
ANDY NEIGEL
President & CEO

The use of technology is critical to our growth. Our online portals for students, employers, and teachers, have begun streamlining the matching process from application to internship, all within a secure environment. Through automation and ease of use, these tools provide the foundation for our team to expand service delivery and meet future needs.

Over the past year, the variety of career pathways has also expanded. Agriculture produced 172 internships in the first full year it was offered, giving youth the opportunity to experience some of the new occupations and technology that are shaping the global food industry. CAREERS has also started building out pathways within the energy sector as we move towards a greener future. In 2022, CAREERS launched the U21 program to help recently graduated youth across the province find paid work experience and careers as well.

A few years ago, we set a lofty goal to reach 6,000 paid internships annually by 2024 and we remain focused, committed and on track to meet this target. Despite the challenges faced, we are very grateful to the schools, parents, employers, and funders who partake in building a strong, sustainable future for all Albertans. With their support and momentum, we are ready and excited for the year ahead.

Some of CAREERS’ original team members were honoured with the Eric P. Newell Award of Excellence at one of many 25th Anniversary events around the province. 

From left to right: Mel Giles, Jerry Heck, Alex Gordon, Eric Newell, Wayne Markley, Ken Saunders
U21 Welding Intern
Local 488

My interest in welding started in grade 6. On the corner of my teacher’s desk was her husband’s welding helmet. It “sparked” my interest immediately – I was hooked. I knew when I was heading into high school I needed to find a school that offered a welding course and better yet – one that offered the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP). I learned at a Jasper Place open house that they offered RAP and registered as soon as I could. I knew this program was the best choice for me to fast track my career. RAP was a great way to earn diploma credits, hours towards my apprenticeship, and paid work experience. When I completed my Welder 1, I received a $1000.00 High School Apprenticeship Scholarship. I learned about CAREERS when I was taking my technical training after high school and I wish I would have known about them sooner. CAREERS opened doors for me through their U21 program. What a great pathway from education to the workforce.

Through the U21 program, I was introduced to Local 488. I knew that this was the organization that would help me excel in my career. They provided courses, training facilities, camps and mentorship throughout my apprenticeship journey.

Over the span of my apprenticeship, I was determined, took pride in my career choice, and had a clear vision and focus. I worked hard physically and academically which allowed me amazing opportunities to work on monumental projects. This experience propelled me to become a 19-year-old Journeyman Red Seal “B” Pressure Welder. I would strongly encourage anyone who is interested in a skilled trade to reach out to CAREERS.

2022 RESULTS

0
Internships
0
Employers
0
Schools
0
Interns since 1997

“Because of this opportunity, I was able to get my journeyperson certification by the time I was just 20 years old, giving me the ability to buy a house, a car, a motorcycle, and a horse. CAREERS also helped me overcome the barriers of being a woman in the trades. I went from a 16-year-old with a dream to the confident, experienced, professional I am today.”

Nicole Howard
Journeyperson Welder

Youth can explore over 50 skilled trades and in many cases, begin their apprenticeship training through the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP). RAP is a joint Alberta Education and Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training (AIT) initiative allowing students to earn hours towards their certification while still in high school.
This model is unique in Canada and currently offered exclusively to high school graduates (ages 18-25) in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo. Participants rotate through employers and take mandatory technical training each year, resulting in a well-rounded and streamlined approach to attaining journeyperson status.
Alberta has long been an agricultural powerhouse, and thanks to innovation and efficiencies, there are more opportunities than ever for the province’s youth to help shape the global food industry. Interns had chance to work in rural and urban settings that ranged from smart farms to veterinary clinics.
Information & Communications Technology (ICT) is one of Canada’s fastest growing sectors and cuts across almost every other industry. In 2022, CAREERS focused on the most in-demand areas, including business marketing, digital design, software development, infrastructure, information systems, and data security.
Forestry continues to be a major driver in Alberta’s economy. CAREERS, in collaboration with Work Wild and Inside Education, exposed youth to the many occupations forestry has to offer, and how they contribute to sustainability. Over the past year, CAREERS facilitated a variety of tours, camps, and worked with the Junior Forest Ranger program.
From oil and gas operations to solar and wind energy, youth can try out a variety of careers that will shape how the world is powered over the next century. This includes dual credit opportunities in Power Engineering and Non-destructive Testing (NDT), giving high school students practical experience combined with college level courses.
Grade 11 students across the province can explore over 200 careers in the healthcare field. While the global pandemic has reduced the number of opportunities for hands-on experience, CAREERS continues to provide awareness and education to attract youth to these in-demand pathways.
CAREERS is committed to providing support and an encouraging environment for young women to explore non-traditional trades and technologies. With help from journeywomen mentors, post-secondary institutions, and partnering organizations, CAREERS held a series of highly popular camps across the province. The experience prompted many of the participants to try an internship.
This initiative was created to provide an additional focus and effort in engaging Indigenous youth in career awareness and exploration. In addition to the full-time Program Coordinators, Indigenous Summer Career Coaches were hired to support youth through career pathways in an expanded choice of occupations. Continued success is strengthened through the formal partnerships with the Alexander First Nation, Fort McKay First Nation, and Fort McMurray Metis Local 1935.
The pandemic limited options for youth to test drive careers in high school and many recent graduates continue to face challenges finding a start to their career path. There are also companies which restrict participation in their workforce to 18+. The newly launched U21 program expands CAREERS ability to help.

“I was introduced to CAREERS through my Off-campus Coordinator, interviewed at Arrkann, and landed a position within two weeks. Students should give it a chance because you never know how far it could take you. I probably wouldn’t have even applied to post-secondary without this; now I’ve been accepted into an Information Technology (IT) program.”

Adrian DeWitt
ICT Intern

The CAREERS Awards of Excellence recognize the remarkable efforts of student interns, employer mentors and off-campus champions in work integrated learning. Communities are engaged to submit nominations every year across the province and student recipients can be eligible to receive a $500 scholarship to support their continued education in their chosen path.

The John Aldred Ambassadorship Award and Eric Newell Award of Excellence honour exemplary ambassadors, leaders and champions of the CAREERS’ mission—enabling youth on their path to rewarding careers.

The High School Apprenticeship Scholarship Celebration highlights student achievement in the Registered Apprenticeship Program and Career and Technology Studies learning pathways. To build off the success of last year’s event, CAREERS decided to again present the event virtually through a live broadcast combined with a small in-person event in Edmonton bringing together recipients, parents, employers, and educators from across the province for a fun-filled and inspirational evening. This year’s event also included online breakout room sessions to engage all attendees in conversation to share success stories and build connections and networking opportunities for the youth.

Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training provides these annual scholarships to support the next generation of skilled trades professionals and industry game changers.

SAVE THE DATE

July 6, 2023
Heritage Pointe Golf Club, Calgary

Financials

OCTOBER 1, 2021 – SEPTEMBER 30, 2022
$ 0 M
EMPLOYERS PAID TO INTERNS

No Data Found

Total Revenue $8,443,375

No Data Found

Total Expenditures $8,584,021

($ 0 )
Net Revenue

As OF December 14, 2022

JIM CARTER, OC, Board Chair | ERIC NEWELL, OC, Founding Chair

ANDRE TREMBLAY
Deputy Minister, Alberta Education, non-voting

BERND MANZ
Corporate Director

BRIAN MCCONKEY
Secretary & Treasurer, Finance and Audit Chair | VP Human Resources, Millar Western Forest Products

DEAN PERKINS
VP Conventional Operations, Cenovus

DAVID LEMAY
Vice Chair, Corporate Director

DONAVON YOUNG
Deputy Minister, Alberta Indigenous Relations, non-voting

DOUG FINGLAND
Director, TA Planning and Logistics Regional Services, Upstream, Suncor Energy

KELLY SMITH-FRASER
Manager, NuHaven Cattle Co.
Chair, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (AFSC)

KRISTIN ROMERIL
VP Operations, Kaizen Automotive Group

MICHAEL COLBORNE
Corporate Director

SANDRA SUTTER
Indigenous Partnerships Manager, PTW Energy Services

WADE CARSON
Sr. Director Product Development, Serious Labs

PATRICIA PELTON
Corporate Director, Past President, World YMCA

SANDRA CARDINAL
Director, Indigenous Affairs, Alberta-Pacific Forest Industries

DARLENE BOUWSEMA
Corporate Director

Leadership Team

Andy Neigel
President & CEO

Ericka Folk
Director Partnerships

Janis Lawrence-Harper
Director Research & Development

Jeannie Hawksworth
Director Finance & Corporate Services

Stacey Rishaug
Director Marketing & Communications

Stefan Rutkowski
Director Operations

The Newell Family Foundation